Excerpt About Otherness

When We are Separated from Our Nature We Experience the Desire to Fill Ourselves

A deep understanding of reality can follow from such a realization of desire. We can see that dualism arises when we are separated from our nature, for it is then that we experience the desire to fill ourselves. We believe there is something external that we need to have, and we deeply believe that we don’t have that something. However, with the energy of desire, when we feel it as the blissful wanting of another—but with a sense of sufficiency, not from lack —we don’t feel the same kind of otherness we do when we have a dualistic perspective. We feel that the other is arising from the same ground as we are. There is a sharing of a blissful communion, and that communion is a recognition that both of you are one reality. We can also feel a loving desire toward our essential nature as the Beloved. Then we are in a dance with that nature, an ebb and a flow with it, and we are not separate—nor are we one. There is enough differentiation for us to feel the excitement of moving toward the Beloved again. We feel that we are, in a sense, ourselves in union. It is nice to appear as two, but it doesn’t mean that there are two. So the appearance of two is what allows the love to have that vigorous feeling of wanting another and the enjoyment of wanting. There is a fullness to this desire, and you know that within each other, you are the same. A dualistic or a monistic view alone keeps us from the recognition that ournature is a continuous unity within which we can view and appreciate one another as a manifestation of reality, recognizing that the Beloved is what you are in union with.

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